Category Archives: Staring

March 2018 Wallpaper

Mar 2018 Wallpaper

Well another late wallpaper, but I sort of have an excuse…  We had a series of snowstorms here in the Northeast and during the second one we lost our internet connection for nearly a week (shoutout to Verizon for getting it fixed when we were one in a sea of thousands that had outages).   So I had this ready to go but had a backlog of real work to plow through first.   My apologies.

I think I’ve mentioned this before…  For some reason I have very few photographs taken in March.  This one came from a trip up and down the east coast in 2009: Sunrise on Wrightsville Beach in North Carolina.

There’s about 2 feet of snow outside our windows right now, but we know that Spring is coming!

Here are your wallpaper options:

Download the 1024×768 version here. (Great for your iPad)

Download the 1280×800 version here.

Download the 1366×768 version here.

Download the 1920×1080 version here. (HDTV widescreen)

Download the 1680×1050 version here.

Download the 2448×1836 version here. (iPads with Retina Screens)

Technical: Canon 7D, EF100-400mm f/4.5 IS USM, 1/2000 at f/4.5, ISO 800.  Processed with Lightroom CC, Camera Faithful profile, lots of exposure tweaks to compress the dynamic range: highlights -17, shadows +10, whites +23, blacks =23, clarity +18, vibrance +15, medium contrast curve.

December 2017 Wallpaper

Winter, so far this year, is coming in like a lamb with crisp mornings vs. snowy storms.  Best wishes to everyone for a happy and safe holiday season.

Here are your wallpaper options:

Download the 1024×768 version here. (Great for your iPad)

Download the 1280×800 version here.

Download the 1366×768 version here.

Download the 1920×1080 version here. (HDTV widescreen)

Download the 1680×1050 version here.

Download the 2448×1836 version here. (iPads with Retina Screens)

Technical: Canon 1D Mark II, 100mm f/2.8 Macro, 1/250 @ f/4, ISO 400.  Processed with Lightroom CC.  Camera Landscape profile, minor exposure tweaks (whites +25, blacks -35), linear tone curve, somewhat aggressive masked sharpening (+100), masked clarity (+20).  Apparently I missed a dust spot.  Sigh!

September 2015 Wallpaper

September 2015 Wallpaper

Another summer is drawing to a close..  Time to exhale.  A view from Lobster Lake in Maine taken on our recent trip there.

Download the 1024×768 version here. (Great for your iPad)

Download the 1280×800 version here.

Download the 1366×768 version here.

Download the 1920×1080 version here. (HDTV widescreen)

Download the 1680×1050 version here.

Download the 2448×1836 version here. (iPads with Retina Screens)

Technical: Fuji X-T1, XF55-200mm f/3.5 @ 90mm, 1/400 @ f/13, ISO 400. Handheld. Processed with Lightroom CC 2015: clarity +15, exposure almost untouched: just pushed the whites +67 with graduated filter below the horizon to better match what the eye would see).

One Hundred Hours on Lobster Lake

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Our intrepid paddling group has returned from our annual expedition.  A bit less ambitious than last year’s Boundary Waters adventure, it still proved to be a wonderful time with good friends and an interesting location along the Northern Forest Canoe Trail.

What follows is a photo journal of our 100 hours on Lobster Lake in Maine.  It is a bit of a travelogue with occasional side-trips into how the photographs were made.  I hope either aspect of the narrative won’t be too boring for the different readers of this article.

I’m guessing your first thought it something akin to “Where the heck is Lobster Lake?”  Fair question.   It’s located a bit north and east of Moosehead Lake (the largest lake in Maine) and about 20-30 miles west of Mount Katahdin.  The lake feeds a western branch of the Penobscot River.  The lake is so named due to its resemblance to a lobster claw.  As near as I can tell, it also the source for the idiom “If you don’t like the weather in New England, just wait a few minutes”.

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Continue reading One Hundred Hours on Lobster Lake

2015 Persieds

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The 2015 Persieds promised to be pretty good this year: no moon and a forecast of clear skies.   From a “sitting on the deck” perspective they came through: we saw quite a number of them when we were out and observing.  As chance would have it Damien and Cayla, our grandchildren, were here for a sleepover and so they both got to see their first “shooting stars”.  That alone made the night worthwhile.

Photographically, however, not nearly as much luck.   I set up the Fuji X-T1 with interval shooting (1 second, the minimum) and with 15 second exposures at ISO 1600.  Sadly my 10-24mm lens only opens to f/4.   With the noise reduction on it was only taking images about 60% of the time, so serendipity was a play.   In the end only 4 frames out of 400+ had meteors in them.  (Lightroom processing was +1.3EV, boosted the whites a bit, and converted to black & white for all but the dawn shots.)

Here’s a time-lapse of the evening.   The first part starts around 10pm and ends up with clouds.  It then switches to around 4am and runs until dawn starts to overwhelm the starlight.   You’ll see a lot of satellites and aircraft and a few flashes here and there of the meteors.

Here are the other 3 meteor grabs:

Very faint in lower-right:

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This looks like 2, but the meteor is in the bottom-left corner (in the trees).  The other streak (center-ish) is a satellite.

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Another faint streak above the tree (just left of center):

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If this were a Friday or weekend, I probably would have babysat the camera all night and grabbed a few more images.   In retrospect, I should have set up another camera with a different timing sequence to get better time coverage… something I definitely considered but given the light pollution from Boston and the hill obscuring Perseus, this worked well enough.  Besides, this wasn’t about the pictures — meteor showers can really only be appreciated in person, preferably with good friends and family nearby.